A Passion for Tradition

I firmly believe you must have a solid background in restoration before trying to design or manufacture a watch.  After graduating with WOSTEP certification from the Lititz Watch Technicum I spent 6 years restoring rare and important timepieces while also preparing my workshop for design and manufacture of high-end watches.  Being able to spend time one on one with some of the finer watches ever made (and some not so fine examples) gave me first hand knowledge of what it takes to make a watch that will stand the test of time. Seeing a watchmakers idea and application for a mechanism, then being able to see what 100+ years of use (and all to often neglect) did to it proved a priceless education.  I still consider the occasional restoration job but am selective, don't hesitate to ask.   

I take immense pride in the manufacturing of my watches and go to great lengths to use traditional watchmaking practices and tools in each and every timepiece that leaves my workshop.  My atelier is outfitted with the same tooling that was used by watchmakers decades ago and still serves me in my craft today, a real testament to the precision toolmakers of the 19th and early 20th centuries.  As a modern watchmaker I do take full advantage of modern CAD systems to aid in the design stages.  My watches, however, are very much handmade and hand finished to the highest level I can achieve. 

I will always strive to offer something in watchmaking that the big names can't, exclusivity. Production numbers in my workshop will never exceed 10 -12 pieces per year.  This promises me the ability to maintain close relationships with my clients and allows me to stay where I am happiest, working at the bench, practicing my craft.  I am in the rare position that my life's passion has become my business, now care must be taken to ensure that this love for haute-horlogerie isn't tarnished under the weight of production.